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Articles from Popular Science

This "map" could change the way we treat cancer

August 1, 2017 - 10:02 -- Admin

There are countless ways for a person to develop cancer, and this tangle of biological routes leading to illness can make it more difficult for researchers to develop treatments and cures. Scientists have already done a lot of work on sequencing the genes of cancer cells. That's given them insight into what a cancer cell looks like and how it grows endlessly. But to know what fuels those cells, and where they come from, scientists had to plot a course back to each cell's source.

Future surgeons might patch you up with synthetic slug secretions

July 28, 2017 - 17:00 -- Admin

Listen, Humpty Dumpty, I hate to break it to you, but while there are certain medical situations where a bandage is good enough to stick you back together again, this is not one of them. Sometimes, even the best intentions (and combined efforts of the reigning monarch's horses and men) aren't enough. Please, go consult with the slug mucus experts immediately.

We need to remember the Tuskegee Study victims now more than ever

July 28, 2017 - 17:00 -- Admin

In November 1974, President Richard Nixon signed the National Research Act into law. Some of the rules established by the law and its subsequent revisions seem so commonsense it's hard to imagine they needed to be codified into a bill. Don't knowingly deny subjects life-saving medication, for example. And don't experiment on people without their consent. But those rules did need to be formalized into the law.

It looks like we're one step closer to creating genetically modified humans in a lab

July 28, 2017 - 17:00 -- Admin

In a US first, a team of biologists has edited a human embryo's DNA. The technique has been used before by scientists in China, but never in the United States, where the ethical debate over editing embryos rages on with no consensus in sight. And according to the U.S. team, their trial has achieved an unprecedented level of success.

Parasitic plants dwell in darkness, feeding on mold and mushrooms

July 28, 2017 - 17:00 -- Admin

You might be under the impression that plants photosynthesize—using energy from the sun to turn carbon dioxide and water into delicious and nutritious sugar—and you're mostly right. Even carnivorous plants like the Venus flytrap practice this process to some extent (though nutrient-poor environments and inefficiency often lead them to supplement their diets with something a little bloodier). But not all flora are capable of feeding off of the sun.

The Navy is preparing its railgun for the future of war

July 28, 2017 - 17:00 -- Admin

From the earliest cannons to the last battleships, the fundamentals of a naval gun have remained roughly the same: hurtle a heavy projectile through the air using gunpowder. But railguns are a clean break from that method, as they use a powerful electrical pulse to drag a projectile at high speed down a long track before shooting it at a target far away.

This "map" could change the way we treat cancer

July 28, 2017 - 09:53 -- Admin

There are countless ways for a person to develop cancer, and this tangle of biological routes leading to illness can make it more difficult for researchers to develop treatments and cures. Scientists have already done a lot of work on sequencing the genes of cancer cells. That's given them insight into what a cancer cell looks like and how it grows endlessly. But to know what fuels those cells, and where they come from, scientists had to plot a course back to each cell's source.

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