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Articles from Popular Science

Februarys will continue to get warmer, which is good for picnics but bad for humans

February 26, 2018 - 10:30 -- Admin

Summer came early to New York City on Wednesday, as temperatures soared to a record 76 degrees Fahrenheit — more than 30 degrees warmer than the average February high. Up and down the the East Coast, from Atlanta to Baltimore to Cleveland to Boston, an unusual warm spell broke temperature records.

The Grim Reaper does not care about the latest longevity study you saw on Facebook

February 26, 2018 - 10:30 -- Admin

Centenarians always want to tell you how much beer they drank. How many cigarettes they smoked. How often they ate bars of chocolate.

Similarly, headlines regularly belt out accolades for every study that purports to show a link between living past 90 and drinking/smoking/eating mac & cheese three times a day. You know the one—its an article that probably goes something like this:

Everything Americans know about science in seven graphs

February 26, 2018 - 10:30 -- Admin

Every two years, a couple thousand lucky Americans get to take a science quiz. The National Science Foundation surveys the representative sample to see how much they (and, by extension, we) all understand about science and technology. And it's not just for fun. The NSF has a vested interest in figuring out what Americans know, think, and understand about the scientific world so they can construct policies in line with our collective reasoning.

An amateur astronomer accidentally caught an exploding star on camera—and it gets better

February 26, 2018 - 10:30 -- Admin

Victor Buso was looking forward to testing his new camera on September 20, 2016. The locksmith and amateur astronomer waited for nightfall and headed out to his rooftop observatory in the city of Rosario, Argentina, where his 15.7 inch (40 cm) Newtonian telescope was waiting. He had no idea he would help capture the start of one of the most unpredictable events in the universe; a supernova.

'Speed reading' isn't real, but you can still train yourself to read faster

February 26, 2018 - 10:30 -- Admin

When I was a kid in the mid-2000s, I saw this black and white photo from the late 1970s. The caption: "Amy Carter and Jimmy Carter participate in a speed reading course at the White House." I was mesmerized. If I could learn to read faster, I'd have a much better chance of meeting my existing goal of reading every book ever written. Without it, I'd never even make it through the local library.

Athletes with asthma tend to do better at the Winter Olympics

February 21, 2018 - 15:43 -- Admin

From cross-country skiing to speed skating, the Winter Olympics is full of breathless feats of endurance. And for a large number of Olympic athletes, the breathlessness isn't just over who will win the next medal—it's from asthma. But if you think the condition could hold Olympians back, think again: Athletes with asthma are more likely to win medals than their competitors.

China is building the world's largest facility for robot ship research

February 21, 2018 - 15:43 -- Admin

China is looking to establish itself as a leader in robotic warships, having made plans to open the world's largest facility for unmanned ship research just north of Macau. The Wanshan Marine Test Site is slated to span 225 square nautical miles of water and islands. It'll reportedly be equipped with satellite navigation, electro optical sites, sonar, and datalinks.

The botany in Obama's official portrait represents his history

February 21, 2018 - 15:43 -- Admin

The National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. is full of familiar faces. Since it opened in 1968, the museum's sole purpose has been to showcase the images of "men and women who have made significant contributions to the history, development, and culture of the people of the United States." A visitor could wander the halls for hours, but there's now more reason to high-tail it to the Presidential Gallery.

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