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Oz Blog News Commentary

The blobs are getting bigger

May 7, 2020 - 11:14 -- Admin

Ever since the self-imposed
isolation caused by the rampant COVID-19 pandemic, I have been addicted to the Johns
Hopkins University coronavirus website1. It gives relatively
up-to-date statistics for most, if not all, of the countries on the planet with
regard to their number of COVID-19 cases and the number of deaths. There is
also a running total of the world’s cases and the number of dead. It centres
around a map of the world which has reddish blobs over each country or region,
with the diameter of each blob somehow relating to the number of cases in that
country or region1. At the risk of sounding ghoulish, it has been
interesting, if disturbing, to watch the spread of the disease across the
planet. When I first stumbled onto the website, Europe was clearly the
epicentre of the disease, something which had been declared by the World Health
Organisation (WHO) in the middle of March2.

As the rate of increase
of infection started to decline in Europe (except for the UK) the epicentre
shifted to the US and, as the rate of increase there has started to slow, the
blobs are now getting rapidly bigger in South America and Southeast Asia, and
soon will in Africa1.

At the time of writing,
there are 3,685,129 cases across the world, with 258,051 dead1. Of
this, the USA, with 4.2% of the world’s population, has 1,204,475 cases, which
is 32.7% of the world’s total, and 71,078 deaths, 27.5% of the world’s total
number of deaths. While this is staggeringly awful, this is not where it will
end. Proportions like this are pointless at this stage while the disease is
still spreading, and are more an indication of the time it takes for the virus
to spread around the world, rather than how badly a nation is doing. This is
not to decrease the guilt that should be sheeted home to the Mango Mussolini
and his entourage of incompetence for their disbelief of reality and their bungling
of the response. That bungling is measured in lives lost.

Sources

  1. https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html
  2. https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2020/03/who-europe-now-worlds-covid-19-epicenter