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MacroBusiness Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 11:39 Source

ANZ job ads are out for March and slowed sharply down 1.4% month-on-month:   Year on year ads were up 7.5%. ANZ chief economist Warren Hogan said: Despite declining slightly in March, job advertisements remain elevated. This follows two months of slowing growth at the start of 2015. We will monitor in coming months, but this may suggest

The post ANZ jobs ads fall away appeared first on MacroBusiness.

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MacroBusiness Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 11:30 Source

The Australian two year bond just hit another record low yield of 1.66%, now well and truly into pricing a third rate cut:   The 5 and 10 year are both still above previous lows so we’re seeing a little curve steepening (supposedly good growth) at least for today. The entire curve will most likely

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Cheeseburger Gothic Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 11:05 Source

One of the joys of having a Stan subscription is their full collection of James Bond films. From Dr No to Skyfall. My all time fave Bond is probably still Casino Royale because you gotta love a rebooted origin story. It was one of the first things I watched on Stan. (I think Breaking Bad might have been the first).

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The Australian Independent Media Network Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 11:03 Source

The title of the article, belonging to the Herald Sun, is “Time to Embrace Life’s Imbalance”.

It sits squirrelled away in the bottom corner of page 26 of today’s business section, a measly couple of hundred words. Easy to overlook.

In it, we are compelled by “business consultant” Judy Reynolds to forfeit a good work-life balance and instead adopt an attitude of “intentional imbalance”.

There’s two words we don’t often hear thrown together. I wonder where else we’d like to implement an “intentional imbalance” in our lives?

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Our brains are complex organs, separated into many parts and units for different functions and computations. According to new research published today in PLOS Computational Biology, this compartmental complexity is what helps us learn new information and retain it for longer. The researchers say these findings may help improve the neural networks involved in artificial intelligence, helping robots learn new skills and remember old ones longer.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Today, the field of oncology is exploring new and diverse ways to fight cancer, from antibodies to vaccines to cracking the genetic code.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Google Maps has done more than discourage us from asking for directions—it has enabled us to explore our world (and others like never before.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Maryland has a big, stinking problem. Every year, the poultry industry produces about 650 million pounds of manure within that state alone.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Blood supplies, especially platelets and plasma, are vital for taking care of injured people. But blood comes with an expiration date. Certain parts of it, like platelets and plasma, survive for less than a week after they've been donated, and even red blood cells only last up to six weeks in storage.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Lightning strikes are one of those dangerous natural occurrences that happen all over the world, spawning myths and adding a bit of atmospheric flair to movies and ghost stories.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Whether it's after a hug from your teenage nephew or in that car on the subway, body odor hangs in the air. Some researchers from Queen's University in Belfast, Ireland have created a perfume that gets stronger when it's combined with moisture (like sweat), and kills the foul odor at the same time. They recently published their findings in the journal Chemical Communications.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:49 Source

Liquids are great at absorbing bullets' energy. Fired underwater, an AK-47 can only send a bullet a few feet forwards, while in the air the same bullets would easily fly over 1,000 feet. This is great news for secret agents looking to avoid henchmen by swimming underwater, but it's impractical advice for anyone else unless they want to carry six-foot-thick tanks of water around themselves at all times. Fortunately, researchers have found liquids that work even better than water at stopping bullets.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

You are hiding from enemy soldiers when an orphaned baby begins to cry. Do you smother the baby, if it's the only way to save yourself and the others from the enemy from being captured? What if you will all be killed if you don't?

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

Whether it's on a keyboard, a smartphone, or even a credit card reader, you spend a lot of your day typing. Well, researchers at MIT noticed the value of this daily habit, and are putting it to a secondary use; they've developed software that can gauge the speed at which a typist is tapping the keyboard to help diagnose Parkinson's disease.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

If the war of the future is a cyberwar, it will need weapons with a specific anti-computer focus. While bullets and bombs can certainly destroy computers, Congress is championing an old missile for the U.S. Air Force's cyber mission. Named the “Counter-electronics High-powered Microwave Advanced Missile Project,” or CHAMP, it's an anti-computer missile canceled in 2012 that might just be brought back to life.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

On the edge of Mountain View, California, they sat. Gigantic, hollow, towering husks. The airship hangars at the Moffett Airfield are a diesel-punk ruin, empty coffins for an era of aviation long since passed. But after decades of disuse, they might usher in the next stage of our cyber-reality. On Wednesday, Google took over the airship hangars at Moffett field and the surrounding 1,000 acres.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

Every bomb that doesn't go off is a future bad day waiting to happen. In Laos, unexploded bombs dropped during the Vietnam War still kill hundreds of people annually. They're also a deadly problem at sea. The Italian Navy recently announced that it has dismantled several underwater mines and lost bombs from World War II--and they did it using robots.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

The MQ-9 Reaper is an aerial beast with a terrestrial home. Built as a heavier-armed upgrade over its Predator predecessor, the Reaper is best known as a scout and marksman flying over the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, where slow speeds, powerful cameras, and long flight times make it ideal for spotting individuals across great expanses of land.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

Jefferson Mok is a communications officer for International Medical Corps Ebola Response Team, currently stationed in Guinea. He previously spent three months in Liberia with Heart-to-Heart International. The Hot Zone, his series for Popular Science, explores the (rubber) boots-on-the-ground response to the Ebola epidemic raging in West Africa.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:45 Source

The whole idea behind the term permafrost, is that it is a permanently frozen layer of soil. Perma = Permanent, Frost = Brrr. Perma + Frost = You aren't getting warm again anytime soon. But in Greenland, that equation is starting to look a little less definitive. With temperatures on the rise in the Arctic, permafrost is melting, and scientists might have just found something that could make it all worse.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:44 Source

Taking 2D photos with your phone is rather popular these days, but thanks to Caltech scientists, soon you may be able to wave your phone at an object and capture a 3D scan of it. You could scan a particularly nice coffee cup, and then instantly send the 3D scan to a 3D printer and produce an exact copy.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:44 Source

You can harden fiber-optic internet cabling against heat, ice, flooding, mold, and even crushing pressures. But apparently not monkeys. The cable's freshly extruded plastic casing is too damn alluring to resist an exploratory chewing session.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:44 Source

Going to the doctor to see if you have strep throat might be a hassle, but it's next to impossible for people who live in remote regions with limited access to healthcare. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University have created a sensitive film that can detect viruses and bacteria, such as HIV and Staph, at home. The film could be used in remote regions, helping medical professionals diagnose diseases and decide on the best treatment from afar.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:44 Source

Can one file a police misconduct complaint against a robot? It's a question protesters in Uttar Pradesh, India may have to answer soon, as police in Lucknow and Uvalde are both getting drones armed with pepper spray.

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:44 Source

Body armor suffers from a core tension: it must be light enough so the soldier wearing it can still fight effectively, but strong enough to actually stop bullets and shrapnel. Durable, shock-absorbing Kevlar is the current standard, but it can definitely be improved upon. What if, instead of making the armor itself a liquid, researchers borrow an armor design from creatures that move through it?

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Popular Science Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:44 Source

Deep in the Amazon basin, shaman prepare a natural tea called ayahuasca to bring its drinkers to hallucinogenic states of revelation. People come to the region from all over the world to take ayahuasca in order to make better contact with their emotions within or the spirits beyond--or simply to try the drug recreationally. But more recently scientists have been investigating ayahuasca as a treatment for psychological conditions such as PTSD and anxiety.

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MacroBusiness Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:35 Source

By Leith van Onselen The Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s (RBNZ) quarterly Bulletin contained the below interesting excerpt explaining how a low inflationary/interest rate environment prolongs the pain associated with high household debt, increasing financial stability risks in the process: In addition to being more exposed to shocks due to high debt levels, households can

The post Why low interest rates are bad for debt holders appeared first on MacroBusiness.

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Cheeseburger Gothic Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:22 Source

"Let's say a guy had a possum problem. Hypothetically speaking, you understand. And let's say that our guy was in the market for another guy to take care of his possum problem. How would our guy go about securing the services of this other guy who would have, let's say, just hypothetically, a certain moral flexibility on and around the question of dealing with said possum?"

At Blunty.

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MacroBusiness Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:19 Source

By Leith van Onselen New Zealand Prime Minister, John Key, has implored Kiwis to celebrate the New Zealand dollar’s impending parity with the Australian dollar, which is expected to occur later today in the event that the Reserve Bank of Australia cuts the official cash rate to 2.0% (see below chart). From Interest.co.nz: Key told

The post Kiwis get set for parity party appeared first on MacroBusiness.

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The Melbourne Urbanist Tuesday, April 7, 2015 - 10:00 Source

Building (rail) connections across the suburbs

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